A Closeted Goth Girl Trying to Make it in the Professional World

Tuesday, March 1, 2011

Stargazer Fluorescent Pressed Powders: Review, Swatches, and A NEON 80'S DAYGLO UV-REACTIVE RAVER LOOK!!

Just after Xmass, I went on the ebay to look for cheap makeup deals and I found a seller offering a full set of Stargazer Florescent Pressed Powders for approx. $30 Canadian including shipping. Stargazer Cosmetics is a UK brand and it is not available where I live so I thought it would be cool to order them and give them a try since I love all that is UV-reactive and neon! Here's a quick review.

THE GOOD: I LOVE UV REACTIVE AND NEON STUFF THAT IS AVAILABLE IN A RAINBOW OF COLOURS! That is all.

THE BAD: The packaging on these powders is quite cheap and I feel like I am going to break them when I open them. The texture of the powders are AWFUL! They are CHALKY! They apply very poorly and do not adhere to the eye well even when I used a base. They were hard to blend as well. The colours are also rather sheer unless you really layer it on which is quite irritating.

THE WEIRD: They spelled "Fluorescent" wrong and I find this quite irritating. It is not flOrescent, it is flUORescent. I am not sure why this bothers me so much.

THE UGLY: The eye safety of these "pressed powders" is questionable. Note that they are officially called "Florescent Pressed Powder" rather than "Florescent Eyeshadow." Interesting. On the Stargazer website, they show pictures of models wearing these colours on their eyes, these products pop up when look in the"Eye Product" section of the site, and you can also get them in and eyeshadow pallette. From what I know about cosmetic ingredients, UV reactive ingredients are never eye safe. If anyone knows differently, please correct me. Anyway, my main point here is that I cannot 100% verify that these are eye safe and that is rather sketchy.

THE VERDICT: These "pressed powders" were a good price and are lots of fun as they are UV-reactive. However, the product quality is low and I am not sure whether or not they are eye safe.

THE PRESSED POWDERS
From left to right: Florescent Rouge, Florescent Rose Pink, Florescent Orange, Florescent Lemon Yellow, Florescent Forest, Florescent Sea Blue.

Room Lighting



Lights on + BLACK LIGHT!


Lights off + BLACK LIGHT!!


THE SWATCHES:
From Left to right: Florescent Sea Blue, Florescent Forest, Florescent Lemon Yellow, Florescent Orange, Florescent Rose Pink, Florescent Rouge.

Room Light

Room Light + BLACK LIGHT!

Lights off + BLACK LIGHT!!


Now let's try a look! Before I show you my look, I must make a safety disclaimer:

PLEASE NOTE THAT I COULD NOT VERIFY THE EYE SAFETY OF THE PRESSED POWDERS USED ON THE EYE AREA IN THIS LOOK. DO NOT LOOK AT THIS PAGE AND THINK, "OH, WELL THIS IDIOT STICK SLAPPED THEM ALL OVER HER EYES, SO THEY MUST BE SAFE!" NO! DO NOT TRY THIS AT HOME! PLEASE USE YOUR OWN DISCRETION WHEN USING PRODUCTS THAT ARE/MAY BE UNSAFE FOR THE EYE OR LIP AREAS, AND IF YOU APPLY THESE TO AREAS THAT MAY BE UNSAFE, DO SO AT YOUR OWN RISK! I AM NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY EYE DAMAGE INCURRED BY ANYONE USING THE AFOREMENTIONED POWDERS ON THEIR EYES. THANK YOU FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION.


FACE: MAC PREP AND PRIME, MAC Studio Fix Fluid in NC15, MAC Select Sheer Pressed Powder in NC15.

LIPS: Lime Crime lipstick in My Beautiful Rocket with Kat Von D Lightning Sheer Lipgloss in Party Animal.

BROWS: MAC Eyebrow Pencil in Stud.

CHEEKS: Evil Shades Blush in Atomic. Atomic is so cool, it is orange with a BLUE shift! You have to see it to believe it!

EYES: Eyes were prepped with UDPP and MAC Paint Pot in Soft Ochre. Stargazer Florescent Pressed Powders were applied in a rainbow configuration with great difficulty. Maybelline Liquid Eyeliner in Black was used on the upper lashline and Urban Decay 24/7 Liner in Zero was used on the waterline. Maybelline The Colossal Mascara was used on upper and lower lashes.

THE EQUIPMENT


THE EYES




WITH UV LIGHT!




As you can see, I used a black light to show the UV-reactivity of these powders in the photos. This consisted of me holding a black light in front of my face in the dark in my bathroom and thus using the camera blind. The results were somewhat humourous......


TINY PUPILS!


ANGRY LOPSIDED EYES!


HUGE PUPILS! I read somewhere that large pupils are considered attractive and that women in Victorian times used belladonna eye drops to make their pupils large and attractive. I must disagree that large pupils are always attractive.......YIKES!


THE LIPS


THE LOOK


Uh-oh.....I found a hair crimper!



7 comments:

  1. I just want to confirm that you're correct about fluorescents not being safe for around the eyes: the United States FDA doesn't approve any fluorescent or luminscent makeup for eye area use.

    I like the look you made with them, though. The blush you're using is GORGEOUS. =]

    -Vijaya
    FierceNerditude

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  2. They're so pretty but I've used them before and I know what you mean about them being chalky and hard to apply evenly.
    As for the safety it's very hard to tell these things. Vijiis is right, the US FDA does not approve neon or fluorescent colours for use on the eye but the EU standards are different. For instance we can buy the Sleek Acid palette which contains neon colours designed for eye use, it's unavailble in the US. So it could be a case of the FDA being overly cautious, or the EU being overly lax :P

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  3. That blush looks so awesome! Too bad about the quality of those "pressed powders". I wonder if you layered them if you'd still get the glowy effect under UV light? Sounds like you're going to have fun playing with these and experimenting!

    p.s., can I just say that I love that you had a UV light on hand to show swatches with?

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  4. ...I'm totally buying these for the next rave I go to.

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  5. Its true...the EU has different rules regarding neon and flourescent makeup.
    I went through a cybergoth phaze a few years back and used to use Stargazer's face and Body paint to do tribal designs around my eyes. Never had any problems with them.

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  6. I'd definitely say the UV issue is one of differing regulations- and I'd point out that generally the EU is much, much more strict in their regulations that the FDA. Not to mention the fact that regardless of the differing regulations, the individual companies are still liable if their product causes harm.

    I'd also suggest, though I'm not positive, that the spelling of florescent could be an American English VS. Brittish English thing...?

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  7. Thanks so much for the review! Great swatches!

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